The Sunday Poem

The Sunday Poem: Nickole Brown’s “Fanny Says”

By |04.25.15|

Reading Nickole Brown’s new book of poems, Fanny Says, is like being introduced to someone you never want to let go, the kind of fierce, tender, acerbic, complicated woman who will snag you by your scruff and tell you what you don’t want to hear, and— in the next breath— what you need to hear. In this special Sunday Poem feature, writer Janlori Goldman introduces us to Nickole Brown's Fanny—a trash-talking, scrappy southerner, sure of all the right ways to do everything, from making potato salad (recipe included) to how to serve her a Pepsi.

The Sunday Poem: A Journey through Japan with Judy Halebsky

By |03.15.15|

 

This week’s Sunday Poem feature is a special guest column by writer Judy Halebsky.

Judy’s second book, Tree Line, was recently published by New Issues Poetry & Prose. (Hats off to the press for producing a beautifully designed book—I see far […]

The Sunday Poem: Tony Hoagland

By |11.29.14|

 
 

There Is No Word

There isn’t a word for walking out of the grocery store
with a gallon jug of milk in a plastic sack
that should have been bagged in double layers

—so that before you are […]

The Gorgeous Nothings: The Envelope Poems of Emily Dickinson

By |07.18.14|

 

For Proust,” Susan Howe writes in her Preface to The Gorgeous Nothings, “a fragment is a morsel of time in its pure state; it hovers between a present that is immediate and a past that once had been present.”

The fragments […]

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The Sunday Poem: Lauren Camp’s The Dailiness

By |04.26.14|

 
The Dailiness by Lauren Camp from Edwin E. Smith, 2013
An Interview with Lauren Camp

Michelle Aldredge: I like the close attention you pay to daily encounters in your book. The image of “folding” appears again and again throughout the […]

The Sunday Poem: Jamaal May’s Hum

By |04.05.14|

 

“I don’t always go into a poem wanting to address a specific issue,” says Jamaal May. “I’m usually led by language and discover what’s nagging me through the process of arguing with a draft. The E.M. Forster adage, ‘How do […]

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The Sunday Poem: Don Colburn’s Tomorrow Too-The Brenda Monologues

By |03.15.14|

 

Journalism and poetry have become for me two ways of reporting on the world, two means of truth-seeking and truth-telling,” says Don Colburn. “Neither holds a monopoly on what we glibly call the real world.”

Colburn came late to poetry during […]

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The Sunday Poem: Lauren K. Alleyne’s Difficult Fruit

By |02.22.14|

 

Poetry is like ice-cream,” poet Lauren Alleyne recently told an interviewer when asked to compare poetry to a food. “It completes joy, but is also a natural remedy for heartache. You can enjoy it in all its flavors, and yet its […]

The Sunday Poem: C.D. Wright Explores Civil Rights in “One With Others”

By |02.08.14|

 
I first encountered C.D. Wright’s poetry through the back door of photography. Years ago, when I was studying contemporary artists working with 19th century photographic processes, I stumbled across Deborah Luster’s collaboration with C.D. Wright, titled One Big Self, in which […]

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The Sunday Poem: Judith Taylor’s Sex Libris

By |02.02.14|

 

As the psychoanalysts Jung and Freud both observed, fairy tales frequently reveal more about a culture than its sophisticated literary texts. These are the stories we hear at a young, impressionable age. Whether we’re conscious of it or not, these […]

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The Sunday Poem: Dean Young’s Bender

By |01.11.14|

 
Bender: New & Selected Poems
By Dean Young. Copper Canyon Press, 280 pages
Choosing a handful of poems from Dean Young’s collection Bender: New & Selected Poems was no easy task. Most poetry collections are hit and miss, but in Dean Young’s case I […]

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The Sunday Poem: Patricia Fargnoli’s Winter

By |12.21.13|

 
When Pulitzer-Prize-winner Mary Oliver chose Patricia Fargnoli’s first book, Necessary Light, as the winner of The May Swenson Book Award, Fargnoli was 62 years old.

“I began writing poems in high school and had a few (terrible ones) published in the school […]

The Sunday Poem: Sophie Cabot Black’s The Exchange

By |12.07.13|

 

“For me, the act of writing comes out of query,” poet Sophie Cabot Black explains in a recent interview with The New Yorker. “Each image turns to the next with its question and gets answered. Or with its answer it gets questioned. Poetry is […]

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The Sunday Poem: Miriam Sagan’s Seven Places in America

By |11.23.13|

 

“Miriam Sagan’s Seven Places is a lovely collection of verbal souvenirs, resonant snapshots plumbing the mists, the touches, the footfalls that evoke place,” writes art critic Lucy Lippard. “Before I started reading I knew some of these places. Now I know them all. […]

The Sunday Poem: Alice Fogel on How to Not “Get” Poetry

By |11.16.13|

 

Alice B. Fogel is poised to become the next Poet Laureate in New Hampshire, following in the footsteps of Donald Hall, Maxine Kumin, Jane Kenyon, Patricia Fargnoli, and others. Governor Maggie Hassan recently appointed Fogel to the five-year position.

Fogel’s third book, Be That Empty, […]

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The Sunday Poem: Ed Skoog’s Rough Day

By |11.02.13|

 

We don’t give much thought to the covers of the poetry books we read, but the genre is plagued by amateurish typography and ill-chosen imagery. Copper Canyon Press consistently has some of the strongest, most thoughtful designs, and Ed Skoog’s Rough […]

The Sunday Poem: Bridget Lowe’s At the Autopsy of Vaslav Nijinsky

By |10.19.13|

 

The publication of Bridget Lowe’s debut collection, At the Autopsy of Vaslav Nijinsky (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2013), is a bit of a full-circle moment for Gwarlingo.

Bridget Lowe was one of the first Gwarlingo Sunday Poets, back in the early days when […]

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The Sunday Poem: David Bottoms’ We Almost Disappear

By |10.11.13|

 

David Bottoms grew up in Canton, Georgia, the only child of David H. Bottoms, a funeral director, and Louise Ashe Bottoms, a registered nurse. Their home had only two books: a King James Bible and a book by preacher Billy Graham. […]

The Sunday Poem: Anne Valley-Fox

By |10.05.13|

“A poet makes everything up, including one’s job description,” says Anne Valley-Fox. “My job: to retrieve rejected or edgy bits of inner material and put them together in ways that illuminate and provoke. My poems seek connections, complications, and small […]

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The Sunday Poem: Joshua Beckman’s The Inside of an Apple

By |09.28.13|

 

The poems in Joshua Beckman’s new book, The Inside of an Apple (Wave Books, 2013), have all the immediacy of a “V” of geese passing overhead: for a brief moment, everything else falls away. While not technically haiku, Beckman’s latest […]

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The Sunday Poem: Janet Kaplan

By |09.21.13|

 

(Note: This introduction and interview with poet and publisher Janet Kaplan are by Adrienne Brock)

While Janet Kaplan has her roots solidly in the New York area, her work reaches into the dirt of both American continents. Born and raised in […]

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The Sunday Poem: Michel Butor Translated by Jeffrey Gross

By |09.15.13|

 

 

According to The New York Review of Books, only 3 to 5 percent of books published in the U.S. are translations. Whether this is the result of American isolationism, or commercial practicalities is a subject for debate, but it’s hard […]

The Sunday Poem: Beth Copeland’s Transcendental Telemarketer

By |09.07.13|

 

The poems in Beth Copeland’s Transcendental Telemarketer evoke a range of emotions and places. They’re colorful and playful, but also rich in meaning.

Copeland writes about the Atomic Bomb Museum in Nagasaki, Hokusai’s “great wave,” and Japanese typhoons, but also Buddhist scrolls, Christian […]

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At a Time When Poetry Was Forbidden, Seamus Heaney Was a Lifeline

By |09.01.13|

We lost one of our greatest poets this week—Irish writer Seamus Heaney. The news of the Nobel Laureate’s death at the age of 74 came as a shock to the literary community, particularly to readers like myself, who considered each […]

The Sunday Poem: Jim Harrison’s Songs of Unreason

By |08.25.13|

 

What a pleasure to have writer Jim Harrison re-launching Gwarlingo’s Sunday Poem series this weekend.

Harrison’s poetry, fiction, and essays pack a visceral punch. His writing is steeped in the senses, in nature, and the American landscape’s violent history of bloodshed. […]