Gwarlingo

About Michelle Aldredge

I'm a writer, photographer, and the creator of Gwarlingo, a crowd-funded arts & culture journal that covers contemporary art, music, books, film, and the creative process. I’ve spent nearly 20 years as an arts enabler, helping thousands of successful artists of all disciplines and working to make the arts more accessible. From 1999-2012 I worked at The MacDowell Colony, the nation’s oldest artist colony, but I’ve also done time at an arts magazine, a library, and an art museum in Atlanta. For two years I cared for injured eagles, hawks, and owls at a raptor rehabilitation center in Vermont. In May of 2012 I left MacDowell to pursue writing, speaking, consulting, and creative projects full-time. (You can check out my recent projects here.) I’ve appeared as an arts and culture commentator on New Hampshire Public Radio, served as the judge for A Room of Her Own Foundation’s Orlando Literary Prize, and received fellowships from the Hambidge Center and Brush Creek Foundation for the Arts. My writing and photography have appeared in RISD XYZ magazine, 2Paragraphs, Psychology Today, Born Journal, and other publications. I offer one-on-one coaching sessions, group workshops, and speak to businesses, arts groups, and students about overcoming the psychological and practical barriers to producing your best work. (Read more here .) If you'd like to work with me one-on-one or hire me to speak at your school, business, or organization, please contact me at michelle (at) gwarlingo (dot) com. -

John Stezaker & the Not-So-Perfect Marriage

John Stezaker’s surreal, handmade collages—comprised of film stills, publicity portraits, and postcards collected from thrift stores and bookshops—are masterful studies in contradiction. They are familiar and nostalgic, but also unexpected and strange. Like a Coen Brothers film or Flannery O’Connor short story, they walk that compelling line between comedy and tragedy.

By | 2017-02-03T20:52:08+00:00 06.22.16|Books Worth Reading, Images|0 Comments

The Sunday Poem: Tony Hoagland

There isn’t a word for walking out of the grocery store / with a gallon jug of milk in a plastic sack / that should have been bagged in double layers / —so that before you are even out the door / you feel the weight of the jug dragging / the bag down, stretching the thin / plastic handles longer and longer and you know it’s only a matter of time until / bottom suddenly splits.

By | 2016-12-18T17:02:33+00:00 11.29.14|The Sunday Poem, Words|0 Comments

The Gorgeous Nothings: The Envelope Poems of Emily Dickinson

  For Proust," Susan Howe writes in her Preface to The Gorgeous Nothings, "a fragment is a morsel of time in its pure state; it hovers between a present that is immediate and a past that once had been present." The fragments Howe is specifically referring to are the envelopes left [...]

By | 2016-11-11T21:48:44+00:00 07.18.14|Books Worth Reading, Images, The Sunday Poem, Words|Comments Off on The Gorgeous Nothings: The Envelope Poems of Emily Dickinson

The Sunday Poem: Jamaal May’s Hum

Jamaal May was born in 1982 in Detroit where he has taught poetry in public schools and worked as a freelance audio engineer and touring performer. His first book, Hum, received the Beatrice Hawley Award from Alice James Books and an NAACP Image Award nomination. (Photo by Tarfia Faizullah) [...]

By | 2016-11-11T21:48:46+00:00 04.05.14|The Sunday Poem, Words|Comments Off on The Sunday Poem: Jamaal May’s Hum

Sonic Boom: Ted Apel & a New Generation of Artists Explore the Art of Sound

Marco Fusinato. Mass Black Implosion (Shaar, Iannis Xenakis). 2012. Ink on archival facsimile of score; framed. Part one of five parts. To make these drawings Fusinato chose a point on the page and then ruled a line from every note in the composition back to that point. This ongoing series, [...]

By | 2016-11-11T21:48:47+00:00 04.02.14|Interviews, Sounds|Comments Off on Sonic Boom: Ted Apel & a New Generation of Artists Explore the Art of Sound

The Sunday Poem: Don Colburn’s Tomorrow Too-The Brenda Monologues

Brenda Arrieta Killian in the wig she wore after shaving her hair at the beginning of chemotherapy. Brenda was the subject of a series of articles Sunday Poet Don Colburn wrote for The Oregonian and is the subject of his new chapbook Tomorrow Too: The Brenda Monologues. (Photo by Stephanie Yao [...]

By | 2016-11-11T21:48:53+00:00 03.15.14|The Sunday Poem, Words|Comments Off on The Sunday Poem: Don Colburn’s Tomorrow Too-The Brenda Monologues

The Sunday Poem: C.D. Wright Explores Civil Rights in “One With Others”

Poet C.D. Wright (Photo by W.T. Pfefferle via Flickr Commons)   I first encountered C.D. Wright's poetry through the back door of photography. Years ago, when I was studying contemporary artists working with 19th century photographic processes, I stumbled across Deborah Luster's collaboration with C.D. Wright, titled One Big [...]

By | 2016-11-11T21:49:12+00:00 02.08.14|The Sunday Poem, Words|Comments Off on The Sunday Poem: C.D. Wright Explores Civil Rights in “One With Others”

The Sunday Poem: Judith Taylor’s Sex Libris

Judith Taylor (Photo courtesy the author)   As the psychoanalysts Jung and Freud both observed, fairy tales frequently reveal more about a culture than its sophisticated literary texts. These are the stories we hear at a young, impressionable age. Whether we're conscious of it or not, these tales of angelic [...]

By | 2016-11-11T21:49:14+00:00 02.02.14|The Sunday Poem, Words|Comments Off on The Sunday Poem: Judith Taylor’s Sex Libris

Kill Me Now Abs & Conversation Lashes with Artist Rachelle Beaudoin

An installation view of Rachelle Beaudoin's Conversation Lashes. Laser cut paper, digital photographs, 2013. (Photo by Michelle Aldredge)   On Thursday I attended the opening for Rachelle Beaudoin's new show, Let's Work it Out, at the Carroll House Gallery in Keene, New Hampshire. Rachelle investigates feminine iconography and identity [...]

By | 2016-11-11T21:49:16+00:00 02.02.14|Images|Comments Off on Kill Me Now Abs & Conversation Lashes with Artist Rachelle Beaudoin

The Sunday Poem: Dean Young’s Bender

Do not encourage small children / to play the trombone as the shortness / of their arms may prove quite frustrating, / imprinting a lifelong aversion to music / although in rare cases a sense of unreachability / may inspire operas of delicate auras.

By | 2017-02-03T20:11:26+00:00 01.11.14|The Sunday Poem, Words|Comments Off on The Sunday Poem: Dean Young’s Bender

Skyscrapers: A Cure For Loneliness & Overconsumption? Judith Dupré on the World’s Most Extraordinary Buildings

Lewis Wickes Hine, A construction worker at the Empire State Building, 1931. (Photo courtesy the New York Public Library Digital Gallery)   Books Worth Reading Skyscrapers: A History of the World’s Most Extraordinary Buildings By Judith Dupré. Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, 176 pages   (Photo © Black [...]

Crystal Bliss: What the Snow Photos of Doug + Mike Starn Teach Us about Originality

Doug + Mike Starn, from the series alleverythingthatisyou, 2006-2007. (Photograph Doug + Mike Starn courtesy dmstarn.com)   Doug + Mike Starn, Big Bambú: You Can't, You Don't, and You Won't Stop, 2010. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art Roof Garden (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images North America via [...]

By | 2016-11-11T21:49:20+00:00 12.21.13|Images|Comments Off on Crystal Bliss: What the Snow Photos of Doug + Mike Starn Teach Us about Originality