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Ravi Shankar

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Ravi Shankar's collections of poetry include Instrumentality (2004), a finalist for the 2005 Connecticut Book Awards; the collaborative chapbook Wanton Textiles (2006), with Reb Livingston; and Deepening Groove (2011), winner of the National Poetry Review Prize. Shankar has received numerous honors and awards for his work, including a Pushcart Prize and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Connecticut Commission on the Arts. He is founding editor and executive of director of the online arts journal Drunken Boat, one of the oldest electronic arts journals on the web. With Tina Chang and Nathalie Handal he co-edited the anthology Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia, and Beyond (2008). Chairman of the Connecticut Young Writers Trust, Shankar is associate professor at Central Connecticut State College and a faculty member of the first international MFA program at City University of Hong Kong.Click the photo to read poetry by Ravi Shankar.
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Mary Ruefle

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A new erasure by Mary Ruefle is a rare event, and the publication of one online or in print even rarer. Her one-of-a-kind creations occasionally appear in journals or are purchased by museums or collectors. In 2006 Wave Books published the acclaimed volume A Little White Shadow, a book of ”haiku-like minifables, sideways aphorisms, and hauntingly perplexing koans,” as described by Publisher’s Weekly. Still, these unique works are difficult to come by, so when Mary offered to share an erasure that had never been seen before, I jumped at the chance to publish it on Gwarlingo. Ruefle is an American poet, essayist, and professor. She has published eleven collections of poetry, most recently, Selected Poems (Wave Books, 2010). Ruefle's debut collection of prose, The Most Of It, appeared in 2008 and her collected lectures, Madness, Rack, and Honey, was published in August 2012 - both from Wave Books. She has received a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, a Whiting Writer's Award, a Guggenheim fellowship, a Frost Place residency, a Lannan Foundation residency, and an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In 2011, her Selected Poems was awarded the William Carlos Williams Award by The Poetry Society of America. Click the photo of Mary to see the debut of her erasure MELODY.
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Meghan O'Rourke

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Meghan O’Rourke began her career as one of the youngest editors in the history of The New Yorker. Since then, she has served as culture editor and literary critic for Slate, as well as poetry editor and advisory editor for The Paris Review. Her essays, criticism, and poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, The Nation, Vogue, Poetry, and Best American Poetry. O’Rourke has been a fellow at the MacDowell Colony and a finalist for the Rome Prize of the Academy of Arts and Letters. O’Rourke is also the author of the poetry collection Halflife (2007). The poem “Extraneous” will appear in her forthcoming collection, Once, which will be published by Norton in October of this year. In April of 2011 her book, The Long Goodbye, a memoir of grief and mourning written after the death of her mother, was published to critical acclaim. She lives in Brooklyn, where she grew up, and in Marfa, Texas. Click the photo to read poetry by Meghan
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Sierra Nelson

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A choose-your-own-adventure book for poetry? Why not! Poet Sierra Nelson and visual artist Loren Erdrich have created their own twist on this concept with their new book I Take Back the Sponge Cake: A Lyrical Choose Your Own Adventure. Each page turn features an ink and watercolor drawing, a poem, and a choice between two sound-alike words that create a variety of paths through the book. The adventure always begins in the same place, but depending on your choices, your reading experience moves by emotional meander until it finally reaches one of the possible endings. For over a decade Nelson has collaboratively written and performed as co-founder of The Typing Explosion and the Vis-à-Vis Society, including at the 2003 Venice Biennale and on the Wave Books Poetry Bus Tour. She received her MFA in poetry from the University of Washington and is a MacDowell Colony fellow. She currently lives in Seattle, Washington. Click the photo to choose your own poetry adventure.
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Patricia Smith

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Patricia Smith has been called “a testament to the power of words to change lives.” Not only is she is the author of six critically-acclaimed volumes of poetry, but she has written plays, journalism, a children’s book, and nonfiction. But it’s on stage that Patricia’s gift for language and rhythm shines. Click the photo to hear Patricia perform her poem "13 Ways of Looking at 13."
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Jane Hirshfield

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Jane Hirshfield was born in New York City in 1953. After receiving her B.A. from Princeton University in their first graduating class to include women, she went on to study at the San Francisco Zen Center. Her books of poetry include Come, Thief (Alfred A. Knopf, 2011), After (HarperCollins, 2006); Given Sugar, Given Salt (2001), which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, The Lives of the Heart (1997), The October Palace (1994), Of Gravity & Angels (1988), and Alaya (1982). She is also the author of Nine Gates: Entering the Mind of Poetry (1997) and has also edited and co-translated The Ink Dark Moon: Poems by Ono no Komachi and Izumi Shikibu, Women of the Ancient Court of Japan (1990) with Mariko Aratani; Mirabai: Ecstatic Poems (2006) with Robert Bly; Women in Praise of the Sacred: Forty-Three Centuries of Spiritual Poetry by Women (1994); and an e-book on Basho, The Heart of Haiku (2011). Click the photo to read poetry by Jane.
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Kevin Young

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Kevin Young was born 1970 in Lincoln, Nebraska. He received his BA from Harvard University in 1992, where he took poetry workshops with Lucie Brock-Broido and Seamus Heaney, and his MFA in Creative Writing from Brown University in 1996.His books of poetry include Ardency: A Chronicle of the Amistad Rebels (Alfred A. Knopf, 2011); Dear Darkness: Poems (2008); For the Confederate Dead (2007); Black Maria (2005); Jelly Roll: A Blues (2003); To Repel Ghosts (Zoland Books, 2001), which was a finalist for the James Laughlin Award; and Most Way Home (1995), selected for the National Poetry Series and winner of the Zacharis First Books Award from Ploughshares.Young is also the editor of the anthologies The Art of Losing: Poems of Grief and Healing (Bloomsbury, 2010); Blues Poems (Everyman's Library, 2003) and Giant Steps: The New Generation of African American Writers (2000), as well as a selected volume of poems by John Berryman for the Library of America. Click the photo to hear a reading by Kevin Young.
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Seamus Heaney

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Seamus Heaney is an Irish poet, playwright, translator, lecturer and recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born at Mossbawn farmhouse between Castledawson and Toomebridge, he now resides in Dublin. Click the photo to hear Heaney recite one of his poems.
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Anzhelina Polonskaya

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Anzhelina Polonskaya was born in Malakhovka, a small town near Moscow. She began to write poems seriously at the age of eighteen, while working as a professional ice dancer. Polonskaya has published work in many of the leading world poetry journals, including Smena, Volga, Novyi Bereg, Argumenty i Facty, World Literature Today, Poetry Review, The American Poetry Review, and International Poetry Review, Boulevar, The Iowa Review, The Massachusetts Review, and Prairie Schooner. In October 2011 the “Oratorio-Requiem” Kursk, whose libretto consists of ten of Polonskaya’s poems, had its debut at the Melbourne Arts Festival. Paul Klee’s Boat, a bilingual edition of her latest poems has just been published by Zephyr Press. Click the photo of Anzhelina to read her poems.
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Natalie Diaz

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Diaz, a member of the Mojave and Pima Indian tribes, began writing poetry in college. Many of her poems deal with the harsh realities of reservation life: poverty, teen pregnancy and meth-amphetamine drug addiction. There is violence, as well as tenderness in her work—a brutal honesty that is both personal and far-reaching. Her ideas and descriptions of reservation life come from a deeply intimate place, but are also panoramic in scope. Diaz acknowledges the larger social and political ills that have led to poor health, drugs, and poverty on the reservation, but she prefers to focus on how these issues play out in her own life and the life of her family and neighbors. Diaz attended Old Dominion University on a full athletic scholarship. After playing professional basketball in Austria, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and Turkey she returned to ODU for an MFA in writing. Her publications include Prairie Schooner, Iowa Review, Crab Orchard Review, and a debut collection from Copper Canyon Press, When My Brother Was an Aztec. Her work was selected by Natasha Trethewey for Best New Poets and she has received the Nimrod/Hardman Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry. She lives in Surprise, Arizona. Click the photo of Natalie to read her poems and to watch a short documentary about her on PBS's NewsHour.
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Andrea Cohen

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Andrea Cohen has the distinction of being Gwarlingo's FIRST Sunday Poet. She set the bar high. Her poetry collections include Long Division, The Cartographer’s Vacation, and her newest book Kentucky Derby. Her poems and stories have appeared in Poetry, The Atlantic Monthly, The Threepenny Review, Glimmer Train, Memorious and elsewhere. She has received a PEN Discovery Award, Glimmer Train’s Short Fiction Award, the Owl Creek Poetry Prize and several fellowships at The MacDowell Colony. Andrea also directs the Blacksmith House Poetry Series in Cambridge, Massachusetts. On April 13, 2011, Cohen reached her largest audience yet when her work was featured on National Public Radio’s Writer’s Almanac. To read work by Andrea, click her photo.
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Matthew Zapruder

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Poet and editor Matthew Zapruder was born in Washington, DC. Zapruder’s poems employ nuanced, conversational syntax to engage themes of grief, perception, and logic. As Dana Jennings noted in the New York Times, Zapruder has a “razor eye for the remnants and revenants of modern culture.” Zapruder is the author of several collections of poetry, including Come On All You Ghosts (2010), The Pajamaist (2006), and American Linden (2002). He collaborated with painter Chris Uphues on For You in Full Bloom (2009) and co-translated, with historian Radu Ioanid, Romanian poet Eugen Jebeleanu’s last collection, Secret Weapon: Selected Late Poems (2008). With Brian Henry, Zapruder co-founded Verse Press, which later became Wave Books. As an editor for Wave Books, Zapruder co-edited, with Joshua Beckman, the political poetry anthology State of the Union: 50 Political Poems (2008). Zapruder’s honors include a Lannan Literary Fellowship and a 2008 May Sarton Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has taught at the New School; the University of California Riverside, Palm Desert; and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst’s Juniper Summer Writing Institute. He lives in San Francisco, where he is also a guitarist in the rock band The Figments.
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D. Nurkse

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D. Nurkse has published nine books of poetry, most recently A Night in Brooklyn from Knopf. Nurkse is also the author of The Fall, Burnt Island, and Shadow Wars. He received a 2009 Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and is currently a finalist for the Forward Prize in Great Britain. Formerly the Poet Laureate of Brooklyn, New York, Nurkse has received the Whiting Writers’ Award, numerous fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, and two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships. He has taught at Sarah Lawrence College and Rikers Island Correctional Facility. To read poetry by Dennis, click the photo.
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Aimee Nez

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Aimee Nezhukumatathil was born in Chicago, Illinois, to a Filipina mother and a father from South India. She is the author of three poetry collections: Lucky Fish (2011); At the Drive-In Volcano (2007), winner of the Balcones Prize; and Miracle Fruit (2003), winner of the Tupelo Press Prize, ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year Award, the Global Filipino Award and a finalist for The Glasgow Prize and the Asian American Literary Award. Her first chapbook, Fishbone (2000), won the Snail’s Pace Press Prize. Other awards include a poetry fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pushcart Prize, the Angoff Award from The Literary Review, the Boatwright Prize from Shenandoah, and multiple fellowships to The MacDowell Colony. Nezhukumatathil is associate professor of English at SUNY-Fredonia and teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific University. She lives in Western New York with her husband and two young sons and is at work on a collection of nature essays and more poems. To read poetry by Aimee, click the photo.
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Eduardo Corral

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Eduardo C. Corral is the 2011 recipient of the Yale Series of Younger Poets award, joining such distinguished previous winners as Adrienne Rich, W. S. Merwin, and John Ashbery. Corral is the first Latino poet to win the competition. Seamlessly braiding English and Spanish, Corral's poems hurtle across literary and linguistic borders toward a lyricism that slows down experience. He employs a range of forms and phrasing, bringing the vivid particulars of his experiences as a Chicano and gay man to the page. Although Corral's topics are decidedly sobering, contest judge Carl Phillips observes, "one of the more surprising possibilities offered in these poems is joy." To read poetry by Eduardo, click the photo.
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Matthew Dickman

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Matthew Dickman is the author of All-American Poem (American Poetry Review/ Copper Canyon Press, 2008). The recipient of The Honickman First Book Prize, The May Sarton Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Kate Tufts Award from Claremont College, and the 2009 Oregon Book Award from Literary Arts of Oregon. His poems are forthcoming or have appeared in Tin House Magazine, McSweeny’s, Ploughshares, The Believer, The London Review of Books, and The New Yorker among others. W.W. Norton & Co. will publish his second book in 2012. He lives and works in Portland, Oregon. To read poetry by Matthew, click the photo.
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Adrienne Rich

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Adrienne Cecile Rich was an American poet, essayist and feminist. She was called "one of the most widely read and influential poets of the second half of the 20th century." Her first collection of poetry, A Change of World, was selected by the senior poet W. H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. Rich famously declined the National Medal of Arts, protesting the United States House of Representatives and Speaker Gingrich's vote to end funding for the National Endowment for the Arts. Click the photo to hear Adrienne Rich.
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Jean Valentine

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Jean Valentine's lyric poems delve into dream lives with glimpses of the personal and political. In the New York Times Book Review, David Kalstone said of her work, “Valentine has a gift for tough strangeness, but also a dreamlike syntax and manner of arranging the lines of . . . short poems so as to draw us into the doubleness and fluency of feelings.” In a 2002 interview with Eve Grubin, Valentine commented about her work, “I am going towards the spiritual rather than away from it.” In addition to writing her own poems, she has translated work by the Russian poet Osip Mandelstam and Marina Tsvetaeva.Valentine has lived most of her life in New York City. She won the Yale Younger Poets Award for her first book, Dream Barker, in 1965. Her eleventh book of poetry, Break the Glass (2010) from Copper Canyon Press, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in poetry. Door in the Mountain: New and Collected Poems 1965 – 2003 was the winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Poetry. Her latest is the chapbook The Ship from Red Glass Books. Valentine was the State Poet of New York for two years, starting in the spring of 2008. She received the 2009 Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets, a $100,000 prize which recognizes outstanding and proven mastery in the art of poetry. Valentine has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and awards from the NEA, The Bunting Institute, The Rockefeller Foundation, The New York Council for the Arts, and The New York Foundation for the Arts, as well as the Maurice English Prize, the Teasdale Poetry Prize, and The Poetry Society of America’s Shelley Memorial Prize in 2000. She has also been awarded residencies at The MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Ucross, and the Lannan Foundation. Click the photo to read poetry by Jean.
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Nick Flynn

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Poet and memoirist Nick Flynn was born in Scituate, Massachusetts, on Boston’s South Shore, in 1960. His debut poetry collection, Some Ether (2000), won the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award. Most of the poems in Some Ether focus on Flynn’s tumultuous family life and include a detached yet affecting look at childhood and trauma. Having written about his family in both poetry and prose, Flynn has said, “The way I write I don’t see much distinction between the two, although prose seems more suited to daylight, and poetry to night. I try to cook both down to something essential—by the end hopefully some balance between mystery and clarity remains.” Nick Flynn’s most recent book is The Captain Asks for a Show of Hands (2011), a collection of poems that are linked to his latest memoir, The Ticking is the Bomb (2010), which the Los Angeles Times calls a “disquieting masterpiece.” His previous memoir, Another Bullshit Night in Suck City (2004), won the PEN/Martha Albrand Award, was shortlisted for France’s Prix Femina, has been translated into fourteen languages, and was made into a film starring Robert De Niro and Julianne Moore. He is also the author of two other books of poetry, Some Ether (2000), and Blind Huber (2002), for which he received fellowships from The Guggenheim Foundation, The MacDowell Colony, and The Library of Congress.
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Donald Hall

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Donald Hall (born 20 September 1928) is an American poet, writer, editor and literary critic. A graduate of Phillips Exeter Academy, Harvard and Oxford, Hall is the author of over 50 books across several genres from children's literature, biography, memoir, essays, and including 22 volumes of verse. Regarded as a "plainspoken, rural poet," Hall's work "explores the longing for a more bucolic past and reflects the poet’s abiding reverence for nature." Early in his career, he became the first poetry editor of The Paris Review and was noted for interviewing poets and other authors on their craft. Hall is respected for his work as an academic, having taught at Stanford University, Bennington College and the University of Michigan, who has made significant contributions to the study and craft of writing. On 14 June 2006, Hall was appointed as the Library of Congress's 14th Poet Laureaute Consultant in Poetry (commonly known as "Poet Laureaute of the United States"). Hall served as poet laureate for one year. Click the photo to read poetry by Donald Hall and see exclusive photographs I took of Hall at a reading in Peterborough, New Hampshire.
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Tung Hui-Hu

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A native of San Francisco, Tung-Hui Hu has worked as a political consultant and computer scientist, and holds degrees from Princeton, Michigan, and UC Berkeley. He is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Michigan and a member of the Michigan Society of Fellows. His nonfiction piece, A History of Clouds in the Desert, examines the legacy of atomic blasts and electronic warfare in the empty spaces of the Nevada desert. Speaking of Tung-Hui Hu’s poetry, Mark Doty said, “This fresh and unexpected poet extends the lyric into the social space without losing any of song’s intensity or mystery, so that these casually elegant, affecting poems feel as interior as they are worldly.” Tung-Hui Hu is the author of Mine (Ausable Press, 2007) and The Book of Motion (University of Georgia Press, 2003). His poems have appeared in The New Republic, Ploughshares, and AGNI. His third collection Greenhouses, Lighthouses, forthcoming from Copper Canyon Press in October, won the 2007 James D. Phelan Literary Award. Described by the San Francisco Foundation as a “provocative gesture towards cinematography,” the book is composed of a series of palinodes, a form that sings back or recants a previous error. Click the photo to read poetry by Tung Hui-Hu.
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Jorge Carrera Andrade

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Largely overlooked by American literary critics, Ecuadorian Jorge Carrera Andrade has long been considered one of the most important poets in Latin America. He began publishing poems in his teens, and his distinguished literary career spanned a wide range of work, from editing and translation to criticism and poetry, much of which was published internationally. Joshua Beckman and Alejandro de Acosta have recently translated Andrade’s Micrograms into English and republished the book as it appeared in the original 1940 edition. Micrograms is part essay, part poetry, and part anthology. It’s entirely unique and also oddly postmodern in its structure. Read selections from Micrograms by clicking on the photo.
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Kwame Dawes

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Kwame Senu Neville Dawes (born 28 July 1962, Ghana) is a poet, actor, editor, critic, musician, and former Louis Frye Scudder Professor of Liberal Arts at the University of South Carolina. He is now Professor of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln and editor-in-chief at the Prairie Schooner. New York-based Poets & Writers has named Dawes as a recipient of the 2011 Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award, which recognizes writers who have given generously to other writers or to the broader literary community. The musicality of Dawes’ poetry is best appreciated when read aloud. Click the photo to hear Dawes read his poem "Tornado Child."
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Jen Bervin

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Jen Bervin’s work brings together text and textile in a practice that encompasses poetry, archival research, artist books, and large-scale art works.The Desert is a poem Bervin wrote by sewing row by row, line by line, across 130 pages of John Van Dyke’s, The Desert: Further Studies in Natural Appearances (1901). She used atmospheric fields of pale blue zigzag stitching to construct a poem “narrated by the air”— “so clear that one can see the breaks.” Her work is in more than thirty collections including The J. Paul Getty Museum, The Walker Art Center, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University, Stanford University, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, and the British Library. Bervin’s books include The Dickinson Composites (2010) and The Desert (2008) from Granary Books, and The Silver Book (2010), A Non- Breaking Space (2005), and Nets (2004, fifth printing, 2010). Bervin has received fellowships in art and writing from The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, The New York Foundation for the Arts, Centrum, The MacDowell Colony, Visual Studies Workshop, The Center for Book Arts, and The Camargo Foundation. Click the photograph to see work by Jen Bervin.
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Gregory Pardlo

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Gregory Pardlo’s first book, Totem, was chosen by Brenda Hillman for the American Poetry Review / Honickman Prize in 2007. His poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Boston Review, Callaloo, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, The Nation, Ploughshares, and Best American Poetry. A finalist for the Essence Magazine Literary Award in poetry, he is recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship and a translation grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. He has received other fellowships from the New York Times, The MacDowell Colony, the Lotos Club Foundation and Cave Canem. Pardlo is currently an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at George Washington University.
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Maureen McLane

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Maureen N. McLane grew up in upstate New York and was educated at Harvard, Oxford, and the University of Chicago. In 2012, FSG published McLane's newest book, My Poets. She is the author of two books of poems, World Enough (2010) and Same Life (2008), and a poetry chapbook, This Carrying Life (2005). She has also published two books of literary criticism: Balladeering, Minstrelsy, and the Making of British Romantic Poetry (2008) and Romanticism and the Human Sciences (2000, 2006); she co-edited The Cambridge Companion to British Romantic Poetry (2008). A contributing editor at Boston Review, she was for years the chief poetry critic of the Chicago Tribune; her articles on poetry, contemporary fiction, and sexuality have appeared widely, including the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, Boston Review, the Washington Post, American Poet, and on the Poetry Foundation website.In 2003 McLane won the National Book Critics Circle's Nona Balakian Award for Excellence in Book Reviewing; she was elected in 2007 for a three-year term on the Board of Directors of the NBCC. Currently an associate professor of English at NYU, McLane has taught at Harvard, the University of Chicago, MIT, and the East Harlem Poetry Project. Click the photo to read poetry by Maureen McLane.
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Jane Kenyon

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Jane Kenyon was born in 1947 in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and grew up in the midwest. She earned a B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1970 and an M.A. in 1972. That same year, Kenyon married the poet Donald Hall, whom she had met while a student at the University of Michigan. With him she moved to Eagle Pond Farm in New Hampshire. During her lifetime Jane Kenyon published four books of poetry—Constance (1993), Let Evening Come (1990), The Boat of Quiet Hours (1986), and From Room to Room (1978)—and a book of translation, Twenty Poems of Anna Akhmatova (1985). In December 1993 she and Donald Hall were the subject of an Emmy Award-winning Bill Moyers documentary, "A Life Together." At the time of her death from leukemia, in April 1995, Jane Kenyon was New Hampshire's poet laureate. A fifth collection of Kenyon's poetry, Otherwise: New and Selected Poems, was released in 1996, and in 1999, Graywolf Press issued A Hundred White Daffodils: Essays, Interviews, the Akhmatova Translations, Newspaper Columns, and One Poem. Click the photograph to read poetry by Jane Kenyon.
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Frank O'Hara

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Frank O'Hara (1926-1966) brought a refreshing new casualness and spontaneity to poetry, making deliriously funny and surprisingly moving verse out of everyday activities recounted in conversational tones. (What he called his “I do this I do that” poems often featured glimpses of his adored New York City or anecdotes about friends—most of whom were themselves poets or painters.) His brilliant career as a writer and art curator was cut tragically short by a freak dune buggy accident on Fire Island in New York. Click the photo to watch Frank O'Hara reading "Having a Coke with You."
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Jim Daniels

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Jim Daniels’ recent books include Trigger Man: More Tales of the Motor City, fiction, Michigan State University Press, (Winner, Midwest Book Award), Having a Little Talk with Capital P Poetry, Carnegie Mellon University Press, (Poetry Gold Medal, Independent Publisher Book Awards), and All of the Above, Adastra Press, all published in 2011.In 2010, he wrote and produced the independent film Mr. Pleasant, his third produced screenplay, which appeared in more than a dozen film festivals across the country, and From Milltown to Malltown (a collaborative book with photographs of Homestead, Pennsylvanie, by Charlee Brodsky), was published by Marick Press. His next book of poems, Birth Marks, will be published in 2013 by BOA Editions. His poems have been featured on Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac, in Billy Collins’ Poetry 180 anthologies, and Ted Kooser’s “American Life in Poetry” series. His poem “Factory Love” is displayed on the roof of a race car.He has received the Brittingham Prize for Poetry, the Tillie Olsen Prize, the Blue Lynx Poetry Prize, two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and two from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. His poems have appeared in the Pushcart Prize and Best American Poetry anthologies.At Carnegie Mellon, where he is the Thomas Stockham Professor of English, he has received the Ryan Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Elliott Dunlap Smith Award for Teaching and Educational Service, and a Faculty Service Award from the Alumni Association. A native of Detroit, Daniels is a graduate of Alma College and Bowling Green State University. He lives in Pittsburgh with his family near the boyhood homes of Andy Warhol and Dan Marino. Click the photo to read poetry by Jim Daniels.
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Joan Murray

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“Working in free verse, Murray is a master of the single, unforgettable detail,” writes the Poetry Foundation. “Her accessible, image-driven narratives harness the urgency of their moral or social context while staying true to the pacing and music of daily life.” Joan Murray is a poet, as well as a fiction writer, playwright, and essayist. Her poetry volumes include: Dancing on the Edge (Beacon Press); Looking for the Parade (W. W. Norton), which won the National Poetry Series Open Competition chosen by Robert Bly; Queen of the Mist (Beacon), for which she received a Broadway commission; and The Same Water, which won the Wesleyan New Poets Series Competition. Her poems have also been in The Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s, Ms., The Nation, The New York Times, The Paris Review, The Pushcart Prize, and The Best American Poetry. She has been Poet in Residence at the New York State Writers Institute and a repeat guest on NPR’s Morning Edition, and is the editor of the Poems to Live By anthologies from Beacon and The Pushcart Book of Poetry: Best Poems from Thirty Years of the Pushcart Prize. The winner of two National Endowment for the Arts Poetry Fellowships, (the most recent in 2011), she lives in Old Chatham, New York. Click the photo to see Joan's series of poems inspired by photographs at the George Eastman House.
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Bruce A. Jacobs

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Bruce A. Jacobs is a poet, a nonfiction author, a working jazz drummer, and an improving saxophonist. He speaks and performs nationally. He has appeared on NPR, C-SPAN, Sirius, and elsewhere. His two books of poems are Speaking Through My Skin (Michigan State University Press), which won the Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award, and Cathode Ray Blues (Tropos Press). His two nonfiction books are Race Manners and Race Manners for the 21st Century, (Arcade/Skyhorse), both of which provide a tour of racism from within each of us.Jacobs’ work has appeared in dozens of literary journals and anthologies, including Beloit Poetry Journal, African American Review, and many others, including the anthology 180 More: Extraordinary Poems for Everyday, edited by Billy Collins.Bruce has won poetry slams at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe and elsewhere. Educated at Harvard, he has received a Maryland State Arts Council individual artist grant and writing residencies at The MacDowell Colony and Ucross Foundation. He writes a weekly creative arts blog, the Tuesday Muse, at agonist.org, and a race and politics blog at aliasbruce.typepad.com. His current projects include one-man performances that combine words, saxophone, and percussion. He is at work on a new book combining the printed word and sound. He lives and writes in Baltimore. Click the photo to read poetry by Bruce.
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Cristian Flores Garcia

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Cristian Flores Garcia was born in Mexico City. She holds an MFA from UC Riverside. Cristián has received fellowships to Canto Mundo, The MacDowell Colony, and the Millay Colony. She’s working on her poetry collection, brickEater. Her poetry has appeared in PALABRA magazine, The American Poetry Review, and Connotation Press. She lives in California.
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James Arthur

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James Arthur’s poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The New Republic, Poetry, Ploughshares, and The American Poetry Review. He has received the Amy Lowell Travelling Poetry Scholarship, a Stegner Fellowship, a Discovery/The Nation Prize, fellowships at The MacDowell Colony and Yaddo, and a residency at the Amy Clampitt House. He is currently a Hodder Fellow at the Lewis Center for the Arts in Princeton. His first book, Charms Against Lightning, is available through Copper Canyon Press. Click the photo of James to read his poetry.
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Susan Briante

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"Growing up working class in New Jersey, I had no models for how an artist should make a life—let alone become a poet," writes Susan Briante. "I majored in journalism at Northwestern University. From this came an appreciation for the documentary, an eye for blessed distraction: a superintendent’s lisp, patterns of ceiling tile. I found myself a “good job” covering school board meetings in suburban Tulsa. The flames from the Sunoco refinery lit up a not-too-distant sky. I lasted about nine months, quit journalism, and left the country for the next seven years.In Mexico City, I worked as an editor and a translator for the bilingual magazine Artes de México. I read Benjamin and Lyotard on crowded collective buses sitting next to indigenous matrons in their huipiles, schoolboys in navy blue slacks, mestizo administrative assistants, earnest engineers with their English textbooks. NAFTA passed. I learned to recognize birds and trees in Mayan textiles. I labored through long passages on the iconography of the Virgin of Guadalupe. The peso collapsed. I fell in with a poet/scholar/mentor Roberto Tejada and his magazine Mandorla. A ski-masked rebel came down from the mountains of Chiapas on horseback. I started writing poetry.I completed an MFA at Florida International University. Cesar Vallejo, CD Wright, Vincente Huidobro, Frank O’Hara, Robert Duncan, George Oppen, and Rosmarie Waldrop served as salve and stimulant. I went to Austin where I pursued an MA in Comparative Literature at the University of Texas. I moved to New York City in the summer of 2001. The towers fell. We wheatpasted Celan and HD on the bus stops and telephone booths of SOHO. For a year, I taught ESL and subletted my way through Williamsburg and the East Village. In 2002, I returned to Austin to work on a PhD. You can still find me there many days writing essays about half-built hotels, Civil War monuments, amusement park ruins. You can find me making poems at the Spider House café. I earn a living as an assistant professor at the University of Texas at Dallas.I tell my students that writing a poem is an act of political resistance. I worry that I have not yet had a baby; I check the prices on flights to Paris; I ride the light rail to work. On a good evening, I drink a tequila or two over ice on my porch and watch the grackles percolate through the scrub oaks." Click on the photograph to read poetry by Susan and to view The Utopia Minus Project, a special collaboration with artist Margaret Lanzetta.
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Bridget Lowe

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Bridget Lowe’s poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, Best American Poetry, Boston Review, The New Republic, Beloit Poetry Journal, and Denver Quarterly, among many other publications. She is a graduate of Syracuse University’s MFA program, and has received a “Discovery”/Boston Review prize, the 2011 Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellowship to The MacDowell Colony, and a scholarship to attend the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. Her first book, At the Autopsy of Vaslav Nijinsky, is forthcoming from Carnegie Mellon University Press in early 2013. She currently lives in Kansas City. Click the photo to read poetry by Bridget.
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Elisabeth Frost

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A poet and scholar, Elisabeth Frost is the author of a collection of poetry, All of Us (White Pine Press, 2011); a chapbook, Rumor (Mermaid Tenement Press, 2009); and a critical study, The Feminist Avant-Garde in American Poetry (University of Iowa Press, 2003). She is co-editor (with Cynthia Hogue) of Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews (University of Iowa Press, 2006). In addition to a Fulbright Fellowship as a visiting professor at the University of Wroclaw, Poland, Frost has received grants from the Rockefeller Foundation-Bellagio Center, the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute, the MacDowell Colony, and the Ledig-Rowohlt Foundation, among others.Frost’s poetry has appeared in numerous journals, including Barrow Street, Boulevard, The Denver Quarterly, The Journal, The New England Review, Poetry, and The Yale Review, and her collaborations with the visual artist Dianne Kornberg have been shown at the Chicago Cultural Center and other venues (www.diannekornberg.com). Frost’s essays, reviews, and interviews have appeared in Contemporary Literature, How2, Postmodern Culture, and The Women’s Review of Books. She holds graduate degrees in literature from Stanford and UCLA, and she received her undergraduate degree from Harvard. Frost is an associate professor of English and Women’s Studies at Fordham University, where she is founder and editor of the Poets Out Loud book series from Fordham Press. Click the photo to read poetry by Elisabeth Frost.
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Alicia Suskin Ostriker

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“When I give poetry readings, my hope is to make people in my audience laugh and cry," says Alicia Suskin Ostriker. They often do. The gamble is that my words will reach others, touch their inner lives." Alicia Ostriker is a major American poet and critic. Twice nominated for a National Book Award, she is author of twelve volumes of poetry. The Book of Seventy (2009) won the Jewish Book Award for Poetry. As a critic Ostriker is the author of two pathbreaking volumes on women's poetry, Writing Like a Woman and Stealing the Language: The Emergence of Women's Poetry in America. She has also published three books on the Bible. Ostriker has received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Poetry Society of America, the San Francisco State Poetry Center, the Judah Magnes Museum, the New Jersey Arts Council, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. She lives in Princeton, NJ with her husband. Ostriker is Professor Emerita of Rutgers University and is a faculty member of the New England College Low-Residency Poetry MFA Program. Ostriker has taught in the Princeton University Creative Writing Program and in Toni Morrison's Atelier Program. She has taught midrash writing workshops in the USA, Israel, England and Australia. Click the photo to read poetry by Alicia.
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Virginia Konchan

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A doctoral candidate in the Program for Writers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Virginia Konchan’s criticism has appeared widely, and her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Best New Poets 2011, Boston Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, the Believer, The New Republic, Notre Dame Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Jacket, and Poet Lore, among other places. Click the photo to read poetry by Virginia.
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John Yau

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John Yau is an American poet and critic who lives in New York City. He received his B.A. from Bard College in 1972 and his M.F.A. from Brooklyn College in 1978. He has published over 50 books of poetry, artists' books, fiction, and art criticism. Click the photo to read poetry by John Yau.
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Robert Hass

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Robert Hass is one of contemporary poetry’s most celebrated and widely-read voices. In addition to his success as a poet, Hass is also recognized as a leading critic and translator, notably of the Polish poet Czeslaw Milosz and Japanese haiku masters Basho, Buson and Issa. Critics celebrate Hass’s own poetry for its clarity of expression, its conciseness, and its imagery, often drawn from everyday life. “Hass has noted his own affinity for Japanese haiku,” the poet Forrest Gander has remarked, “and his work similarly attends to the details of quotidian life with remarkable clarity.” Gander described Hass’s gift for “musical, descriptive, meditative poetry.” “Robert Hass,” stated Carolyn Kizer in the New York Times Book Review, “is so intelligent that to read his poetry or prose, or to hear him speak, gives one an almost visceral pleasure.” Click the photograph to hear Hass read his translations of Kobayashi Issa.
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U.A. Fanthorpe

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A practicing Quaker, Fanthorpe was the first woman to be nominated for the post of Professor of Poetry at Oxford. She was awarded the CBE in 2001 and the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry in 2003, when her Collected Poems were published. In 2010 Enitharmon published her definitive volume New and Collected Poems, which features a preface by Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy. Click the photo to read poems by U.A. Fanthorpe.
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Conrad Hilberry

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Conrad Hilberry was born in Ferndale, Michigan, and is a longtime resident of the Great Lakes region. He earned a BA from Oberlin College and an MA and PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison; he was a professor of English at Kalamazoo College in Michigan from 1962 to 1998. Hilberry has written twelve collections of poetry, including Encounter on Burrows Hill and Other Poems (1968), Rust (1974), Man in the Attic (1980), Sorting the Smoke: New and Selected Poems (1990), winner of the Iowa Prize, Player Piano: Poems (2000), The Fingernail of Luck (2005), and After-Music (2008). In 2009 he co-authored This Awkward Art: Poems by a Father and Daughter with the poet Jane Hilberry, his daughter. A master of both free verse and received forms, Hilberry infuses the familiar and everyday with intellectual insight. Poet Henry Taylor has said that Hilberry’s poems possess “the spooky ability to make odd, though rarely surreal, connections. The poems move with quiet authority from the observation of a particular, and of the possibilities surrounding it, to exploration of what might happen next. The miracle is that they do this without arbitrariness.”Hilberry is also the author of the nonfiction book Luke Karamazov (1987), an account of serial murderers in Kalamazoo. He has co-edited three volumes of “Third Coast” poetry from Michigan—the most recent, New Poems from the Third Coast: Contemporary Michigan Poetry, in 2000. Click the photo to read poetry by Conrad Hilberry.
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Hayden Carruth

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Carruth was recognized with an award from Poetry magazine in 1954, and his first collection, The Crow and the Heart, was published in 1959. But it wasn’t until 1992 that he reached a wider national audience when Collected Shorter Poems, 1946-1991 won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Four years later, he won a National Book Award for Scrambled Eggs and Whiskey: Poems 1991-1995. Click the photograph to read my selections from Hayden Carruth's Last Poems from Copper Canyon Press.
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Carl Dennis

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Using a plain spoken, even conversational style, Dennis’s work stands out for its consistent ability to shape everyday speech patterns into a “casually regular” pentameter line, as Burt noted. Or as Martin Pops, a colleague at Buffalo, put it: “Carl speaks the same language as we do. The only difference is, he speaks it better.” But Dennis’s moderate, easy tone—his accessibility—frequently masks a deep sense of nostalgia, loss, grief, and even fear. “His level discursiveness, his ongoing syntax, can become almost scary,” Burt notes. “If you keep talking intelligibly (the style implies), so that other people understand you, you will have some way to know that you are still alive.” Click the photo to read poetry by Pulitzer-Prize winner Carl Dennis.
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Matthew Yeager

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Other distinctions include the 2009 Barthelme Prize in Short Prose and two fellowships from The MacDowell Colony. The son of a coal-miner’s daughter, he graduated high school in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1998. His hobbies include bicycling, visiting the chiropractor, and consuming as much content as possible as pertains to the Cincinnati Bengals. With Sean Logan, he is the co-founder of Chicken Truck Productions; he lives in Brooklyn, New York. Click the photo to read poems by Matt.
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Sarah Valentine

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Sarah Valentine’s first book of translations, Into the Snow: Selected Poems of Gennady Aygi, is a collection of poems translated from the Russian-language poetry of Chuvash poet Gennady Aygi (1934-2006). Individual translations have been featured in the Two Lines anthology Some Kind of Beautiful Signal, as well as in journals such as diode, Circumference, and Redaction: Poetry and Poetics. Sarah has a BA in Russian Studies and Creative Writing from Carnegie Mellon University and a PhD in Russian Literature from Princeton University. She has received a Templeton Foundation grant for her research at Princeton University’s Center for the Study of Religion and a prestigious Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities at UCLA. Sarah lives and Los Angeles and is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of California, Riverside, in the Department of Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages where she teaches Russian literature, comparative literature, film, and critical theory. Click on the photo to read Sarah Valentine's translations of Gennady Aygi's poetry.
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Judith Kitchen

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Her awards include two Pushcart Prizes for an essay, the Lillian Fairchild Award for her novel, the Anhinga Prize for poetry, and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. She has served as judge for the AWP Nonfiction Award, the Pushcart Prize in poetry, the Oregon Book Award, and the Bush Foundation Fellowships, among others. Kitchen is an Advisory and Contributing Editor for The Georgia Review where she is a regular reviewer of poetry. Click the photo to read poetry by Judith Kitchen.
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John Poch

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John Poch is the author of three collections of poems, Two Men Fighting with a Knife, Poems, and most recently Dolls (Orchises Press 2009). He is also the co-author of Hockey Haiku: The Essential Collection. His poems have appeared in The Paris Review, Poetry, The New Republic, Yale Review, and other journals. He teaches in the creative writing program at Texas Tech University. Click the photo to read poetry by John Poch.
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Carol Muske-Dukes

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Muske-Dukes is professor of English and Creative Writing and founding Director of the PhD Program in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California. She has also taught in the MFA programs at Columbia, UVA, UC Irvine, and the Iowa Writers Workshop. She also works with the teen literacy project GET LIT: Words Ignite. She has received many awards and honors, including a Guggenheim fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, a 2012 Barnes & Noble Writer for Writers award, an Ingram-Merrill, the Witter Bynner award from the Library of Congress, the Castagnola award from the Poetry Society of America and several Pushcart Prizes. Click the photo to read poetry by Carol Muske-Dukes.
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Stephen Dunn

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Stephen Dunn is the author of 16 books of poetry, including the recent Here and Now (Norton, 2011) and What Goes On: Selected and New Poems 1995-2009 (Norton, 2010). His Different Hours was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2001, and his many other awards include the Paterson Prize for Sustained Literary Achievement, fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Foundations, and an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd. To read poetry by Stephen Dunn, click the above photo.
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Iain Haley Pollock

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In the January/February 2012 issue of Poet’s and Writers, Pollock says that he finds inspiration for his work from “Stories of family, friends, and neighbors; the high murder rate in Philadelphia; the early Chicago electric blues; the Catholic Mass; the endurance of slavery; autumn; the jazz of Miles Davis and Charles Mingus; Jewish mourning rituals; the painter Barkley Hendricks; the trees on the Schuylkill River walk and at Springside Chestnut Hill Academy; Philadelphians’ eccentricities; lake-effect snow; and, of course, the beautiful woman with whom I live.” Click the photo to read poetry by Iain Haley Pollock.
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Merry Fortune

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Merry Fortune is a poet and vocalist of German and Native American descent. She is the author of the newly published Deep Red Guild (Straw Gate Books, 2012) and Ghosts by Albert Ayler (Futurepoem books, 2004). A former co-editor of The World, editor of Pagan Place, and coordinator of The Poetry Project’s Monday night reading series, Merry has been performing and reading throughout New York for many years; highlights include performances with composer Butch Morris’ A Chorus of Poets. Her work has appeared in several anthologies: Many Mountains Moving, The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry, and The Unbearables’ publications The Big Book of Sex, Help Yourself! and Worst Book collections. Merry has taught writing workshops at both the Poetry Project and the Borough of Manhattan Community College. Her poems, reviews and articles have appeared in many publications including Beyond Race, High Times, L Magazine, Lungfull!, The Poetry Project Project Newsletter, Press 1, and Sensitive Skin. She has produced a recording titled The Love Dogs of Misfortune and has a collaboration on the 3-D compilation State of the Union produced by Elliott Sharp. Merry was born in downtown Brooklyn and currently lives and works in New York. Click the photo to read poetry by Merry Fortune.
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Rodney Jones

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Jones has noted of his youth in Alabama, “Many of our neighbors were illiterate, but books were the alternative and, even among the illiterate, there was a vital oral tradition: stories, jokes, music, memorized scripture.” Jones’s work is known for its investigation of place and memory, and its use of narrative, anecdote, and image. In books from his first celebrated debut, The Story They Told Us of Light (1980), which was chosen by Elizabeth Bishop for the Associated Writing Programs Award series, to the Pulitzer-prize nominated Elegy for the Southern Drawl (1999) and Salvation Blues (2006). His most recent book is Imaginary Logic (2011). The New York Times Book Review noted, “Jones is a rowdy sort of poet who packs his language with noise. His poems balance on the edge of cacophony, then slip back into a clarity that is sometimes astonishing.” Click the photo to read poetry by Rodney Jones.
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Deanne Stillman

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Deanne’s work is widely anthologized, and her plays have won prizes in festivals around the country. She is a member of the core faculty at the UC Riverside-Palm Desert Low Residency MFA Creative Writing Program. Click the photo to read Deanne's poem about the shooting in Tuscon.
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Gregory Orr

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He is considered by many to be a master of short, lyric free verse. Much of his early work is concerned with seminal events from his childhood, including a hunting accident when he was twelve in which he accidentally shot and killed his younger brother, followed shortly by his mother's unexpected death, and his father's later addiction to amphetamines. Some of the poems that deal explicitly with these incidents include "A Litany," "A Moment," and "Gathering the Bones Together," in which he declares: "I was twelve when I killed him; / I felt my own bones wrench from my body." In the opening of his essay, "The Making of Poems," broadcast on National Public Radio's All Things Considered, Orr said, "I believe in poetry as a way of surviving the emotional chaos, spiritual confusions and traumatic events that come with being alive." Click on the photo to read poetry by Gregory Orr.
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Naomi Shihab Nye

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Naomi Shihab Nye is a poet, songwriter, and novelist. She was born to a Palestinian father and American mother. Although she regards herself as a "wandering poet", she refers to San Antonio as her home. She visited her grandmother in Palestine when she was 14, which gave her a whole new perspective on poetry. Click the photo to hear Naomi Shihab Nye read her poetry.
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Christopher Robinson

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Christopher Robinson is a writer, teacher and translator currently living in the wind. He earned his MA in poetry from Boston University and his MFA from Hunter College. His work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Alaska Quarterly Review, Night Train, Kenyon Review, Nimrod, Chiron Review, Umbrella Factory, FlatmanCrooked, McSweeney’s Online, Mare Nostrum, and elsewhere. He is a recipient of fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, the Sante Fe Art Institute, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. He has been a Ruth Lilly Fellowship finalist for the last two years. Click the photo to read poetry by Christopher Robinson.
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Noelle Kocot

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Noelle Kocot is the author of five collections of poetry, most recently, The Bigger World (Wave Books, 2011), and a book of translations of some of the poems of Tristan Corbière, Poet by Default (Wave Books, 2011). Her previous works include the discography Damon's Room, (Wave Books Pamphlet Series, 2010), Sunny Wednesday (Wave Books, 2009) and Poem for the End of Time and Other Poems (Wave Books, 2006). She is also the author of 4 and The Raving Fortune (both from Four Way Books). Her poems have been anthologized in Best American Poetry 2001 and Best American Poetry 2012. She is the recipient of awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Academy of American Poets, The Fund for Poetry and the American Poetry Review. She currently lives in New Jersey. Click the photo to read poetry by Noelle.
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Bruce Snider

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Bruce Snider is a writer and teacher. He is the author of two poetry collections, Paradise, Indiana, winner of the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Poetry Prize, and The Year We Studied Women, winner of Felix Pollak Prize in Poetry. A former Wallace Stegner fellow and Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, he’s also the recipient of a James A. Michener fellowship from The University of Texas at Austin, where he received his MFA in poetry and playwriting. Bruce’s other awards include residencies at the Millay Colony, the Amy Clampitt House, and the James Merrill House as well as a fellowship to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry 2012, American Poetry Review, Poetry, Ploughshares, Pleiades Gulf Coast, and Gettysburg Review. He has taught at numerous universities including Stanford University, the University of Texas at Austin, Saint Mary’s College of California, University of San Francisco, and Connecticut College. He is currently the Jenny McKean Moore Writer-in-Washington at George Washington University in Washington DC for 2012-2013. Click the photo to read a selection of poems by Bruce Snider.
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Peter Balakian

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Peter Balakian is the author of six books of poems, most recently Ziggurat (University of Chicago Press 2010). His other books include June-tree: New and Selected Poems, 1974-2000, and Black Dog of Fate, which won the PEN/Albrand Prize for memoir. Balakian’s prizes and awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. His work has been published widely in American magazines and journals, such as The Nation, The New Republic, Partisan Review, Poetry, and Art In America. Balakian has appeared on national television and radio programs, such as “ABC World News Tonight,” “The Charlie Rose Show,” “Fresh Air”; NPR’s “Weekend Edition,” CNN, and Leonard Lopate’s WNYC. He teaches at Colgate University. Click the photo to read poetry by Peter Balakian.
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Gennady Aygi

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Gennady Aygi was one of the outstanding Russian poets of the 20th century. His most important works remained virtually unpublished in the Soviet Union until the 1980s, by which time he had been published and translated in more than 20 countries and several times nominated for a Nobel prize. Click the photo to read poetry by Gennady Aygi, translated by Sarah Valentine.
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Kobayashi Issa

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Japanese poet Kobayashi Issa was born in 1763 to a farming family in rural Japan. He eventually took the pen name Issa, which means “cup of tea” or, according to poet Robert Hass, “a single bubble in steeping tea.” Issa wrote over 20,000 haiku, which have won him readers up to the present day. Though his works were popular, he suffered great monetary instability. As R.H. Blyth explains in A History of Haiku, despite a multitude of personal trials, Issa’s poetry reflects a childlike simplicity, making liberal use of local dialects and conversational phrases, and ‘including many verses on plants and the lower creatures. Issa wrote 54 haiku on the snail, 15 on the toad, nearly 200 on frogs, about 230 on the firefly, more than 150 on the mosquito, 90 on flies, over 100 on fleas and nearly 90 on the cicada, making a total of about one thousand verses on such creatures.’ Issa’s haiku are as attentive to the small creatures of the world—mosquitoes, bats, cats—as they are tinged with sorrow and an awareness of the nuances of human behavior. Click the photo to hear Robert Hass read his translations of Issa's haikus.
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Martha Collins

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Collins founded the Creative Writing Program at UMass-Boston, and for ten years was Pauline Delaney Professor of Creative Writing at Oberlin College. She is currently editor-at-large for FIELD magazine and one of the editors of the Oberlin College Press. In spring 2010, she served as Distinguished Visiting Writer at Cornell University. Click the photo to read poetry by Martha Collins.
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W.S. Merwin

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W.S. Merwin is a major American writer whose poetry, translations, and prose have won praise since W.H. Auden awarded his first book, A Mask for Janus (1952), the Yale Younger Poets Prize. Though that first book reflected the formalism of the period, Merwin eventually became known for an impersonal, open style that eschewed punctuation. Writing in the Guardian, Jay Parini described Merwin’s mature style as “his own kind of free verse, [where] he layered image upon bright image, allowing the lines to hang in space, largely without punctuation, without rhymes . . . with a kind of graceful urgency.” Although Merwin’s writing has undergone stylistic changes through the course of his career, a recurring theme is man’s separation from nature. The poet sees the consequences of that alienation as disastrous, both for the human race and for the rest of the world. Merwin, who is a practicing Buddhist as well as a proponent of deep ecology, has lived since the late 1970s on an old pineapple plantation in Hawaii which he has painstakingly restored to its original rainforest state.
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Caitlin Doyle

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Caitlin Doyle’s poems have appeared in several publications, including The Atlantic, The Threepenny Review, Best New Poets 2009, The Boston Review, Black Warrior Review, The Warwick Review, and Measure. She has been awarded residency fellowships in poetry from the MacDowell Colony, the Ucross Foundation, the Jentel Foundation, the Edward Albee Foundation, the Vermont Studio Center, and others. Caitlin received her MFA in Poetry from Boston University, where she held the George Starbuck Fellowship in Poetry.

Caitlin has taught poetry as the Writer-In-Residence at St. Albans School in Washington, DC, served as the Jack Kerouac Writer-In-Residence at the Kerouac House in Orlando, FL, and taught as a Lecturer in Creative Writing at Boston University. She currently teaches Creative Writing as the Emerging Writer Resident at Penn State University, Altoona.

Of recent note, Caitlin has received an Amy Award in Poetry through Poets & Writers Magazine, a Tennessee Williams Scholarship in Poetry for the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, multiple Pushcart Prize nominations, and an Artist Grant through the Elizabeth George Foundation.
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Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz

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Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz is the author of five books of poetry—Dear Future Boyfriend (2000), Hot Teen Slut (2001), Working Class Represent (2004), Oh, Terrible Youth (2007) and Everything is Everything (2010)—all currently available from Write Bloody Publishing.

She is also author of the nonfiction book, Words In Your Face: A Guided Tour Through Twenty Years of the New York City Poetry Slam, which Billy Collins wrote “leaves no doubt that the slam poetry scene has achieved legitimacy and taken its rightful place on the map of contemporary literature.”

Aptowicz is the founder and host of the NYC-Urbana Poetry Slam venue, a three-time National Poetry Slam championship venue. Jo Reed of Art Works (the official podcast of the National Endowment for the Arts) said, “Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz is something of a legend in NYC’s slam poetry scene. She is lively, thoughtful, and approachable looking to engage the audience with her work and deeply committed to the community that art in general and slam poetry in particular can create.”
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Thomas Rain Crowe

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Thomas Rain Crowe is an internationally published and recognized author of thirty books of original and translated works.

About his book, The Laugharne Poems, which was published in Wales by Carreg Gwalch Press in 1997, Welsh poet Menna Elfyn has written: "These poems try to capture certain magical moments, places, people and local histories that echo the rich and enchanting world that Dylan Thomas intimately knew and depicted in his stories and his poems. Like Dylan, he seeks to cut out the formalities of life and find his own voice. Like the bardic wordiness of Dylan, also there is a sense that the poetry on the page can be enriched in live performance, and in the sheer energy of the delivery of song."

He currently resides in the Tuckasegee community of Jackson County in the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina. His literary archives have been purchased by and are collected at the Duke University Special Collections Library in Durham, North Carolina.

Click the photo to read poetry by Thomas Rain Crowe.
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Janlori Goldman

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Janlori Goldman is a poet, lawyer, and teacher. In 2011 her first manuscript, Rough Comfort, was a finalist for the Philip Levine Prize for Poetry from California State University, Fresno, and the Alice James Kinreth Gensler Award. Her poems have been published in Calyx, The Cortland Review, Contrary, Connotation Press, Mudlark, The Sow’s Ear, Four and Twenty, The Mom Egg, Storyscape Journal, and Gertrude Press.

For many years Janlori worked as a civil rights advocate, specializing in privacy and health. Recently, she has taught at Columbia University in the School of Public Health, the Narrative Medicine Program, and the law school. Janlori co-edited For the Crown of Your Heads: Poems for Haiti to raise money for the rebuilding of a library destroyed in the recent earthquake.

Click the photo to read poetry by Janlori Goldman.
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Mark Doty

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Mark Doty’s Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems, won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. He has eight books of poems and has also published four volumes of nonfiction prose and Dog Years, which was a New York Times bestseller in 2007.

Doty lives in New York City and on the east end of Long Island. He is Professor/Writer in Residence at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Click the photo to read poetry by Mark Doty.
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John Lane

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John Lane is Professor of English and environmental studies at Wofford College and director of the college’s Goodall Environmental Studies Center. Also poet, essayist and author of numerous books, Lane has been teaching students in English and creative writing since joining his alma mater in 1988.

Lane is the author of a dozen books of poetry and prose. His latest, Abandoned Quarry: New & Selected Poems was recently released by Mercer University Press in Macon, Ga. The book includes much of Lane’s published poetry over the past 30 years, plus a selection of new poems.

Click the photo to read poetry by John Lane.
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Erica Funkhouser

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Erica Funkhouser’s most recent book of poems, Earthly, was published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in April of 2008. Other Houghton Mifflin titles include Pursuit (2002), The Actual World (1997) and Sure Shot And Other Poems (1992). Natural Affinities was published by Alice James Books in 1983.

In 2007 she received a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry. She lives in Essex, Massachusetts, and teaches at MIT.

Click the photo to read poetry by Erica Funkhouser.
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Evie Shockley

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Evie Shockley is the author of two books of poetry, the new black (Wesleyan University Press, 2011) and a half-red sea (Carolina Wren Press, 2006), and two chapbooks, 31 words * prose poems (Belladonna* Books, 2007) and The Gorgon Goddess (Carolina Wren Press, 2001).

She currently lives in Jersey City, New Jersey and teaches African American literature and creative writing at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

Click the photo to read poetry by Evie Shockley.
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Paula Bohince

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Paula Bohince is the author of two poetry collections, both from Sarabande Books: The Children (2012) and Incident at the Edge of Bayonet Woods (2008). Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The TLS, Poetry, Granta, Slate, The Nation, and The Yale Review.

She has taught at New York University, where she received an MFA, the New School and elsewhere. She lives in Pennsylvania.

Click the photo to read poetry by Paula Bohince.
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Patricia Spears Jones

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Patricia Spears Jones is a poet, playwright, and cultural commentator. She is author of Painkiller and Femme du Monde (Tia Chucha Press) and The Weather That Kills (Coffee House Press) and three chapbooks, most recently Swimming to America (Red Glass Books) and two plays commissioned and produced by Mabou Mines, the internationally acclaimed experimental theater group.

She has taught at Parsons, New School University; Queens College, and The College of New Rochelle.A native of Arkansas, Patricia Spears Jones lives in New York City.

Click the photo to read poetry by Patricia Spears Jones.
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G.C. Waldrep

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G.C. Waldrep is the author of four poetry collections, most recently Archicembalo (2009), winner of the Dorset Prize, Your Father on the Train of Ghosts (2011), a collaboration with the poet John Gallaher, and Disclamor(2007). His work has appeared widely in journals, including Poetry, Ploughshares, APR, New American Writing, Boulevard, New England Review, Threepenny Review, Harper’s, and Tin House, as well as in The Best American Poetry 2010 and Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology (2nd edition).

Since 2007 he has lived in Lewisburg, Pa., where he teaches at Bucknell University, edits the journal West Branch, and serves as Editor-at-Large for The Kenyon Review.

Click the photo to read poetry by G.C. Waldrep.
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Brenda Shaughnessy

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Brenda Shaughnessy is the author of Interior with Sudden Joy (1999), Human Dark with Sugar (2008), winner of the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets, and Our Andromeda (2012). Her work has appeared in the Yale Review, the Boston Review, McSweeney’s, and Best American Poetry, among other places.

She has taught at universities including Columbia, the New School, Princeton, and New York University. Poetry editor-at-large of Tin House Shaughnessy is currently an assistant professor of English at Rutgers University, where she also teaches in the MFA program. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband, son, and daughter.

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Kathryn Stripling Byer

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Kathryn Stripling Byer's poetry, prose, and fiction have appeared widely, including Hudson Review, Poetry, The Atlantic, Georgia Review, Shenandoah, and Southern Poetry Review. Her first book of poetry, The Girl in the Midst of the Harvest, was published in the AWP Award Series in 1986, selected by John Frederick Nims, followed by the Lamont (now Laughlin) prize-winning Wildwood Flower, from LSU Press.

She has received various awards, including the Hanes Poetry Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers and the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance Poetry Award. She lives in the mountains of western North Carolina with her husband and three dogs.

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Terrance Hayes

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Terrance Hayes was born in Columbia, South Carolina in 1971. He received a B.A. from Coker College in Hartsville, South Carolina, and an M.F.A. from the University of Pittsburgh writing program.

Hayes is the author of Lighthead (Penguin, 2010), Wind in a Box (Penguin, 2006), Hip Logic (Penguin, 2002) and Muscular Music (Carnegie Mellon University Contemporary Classics, 2005, and Tia Chucha Press, 1999). His honors include a Whiting Writers’ Award, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

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Michelle Bitting

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Michelle Bitting grew up in Los Angeles next to the Pacific Ocean. She studied and performed theater, dance and music before turning her full attention to creative writing. Her work is published or forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Prairie Schooner, Narrative, Rattle, Nimrod, River Styx, Crab Orchard Review, diode, Linebreak, the L.A. Weekly and others. Poems have appeared on Poetry Daily and as the Weekly Feature on Verse Daily.

Michelle has taught poetry in the U.C.L.A. Extension Writer’s Program, at Twin Towers prison with a grant from Poets & Writers Magazine and is proud to be an active California Poet in the Schools. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband, actor Phil Abrams, and their two teenage children.

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Mari L’Esperance

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Mari L’Esperance was born in Kobe, Japan, to a Japanese mother and a French Canadian-American father and was raised in Southern California, Micronesia, and Japan. Her full-length collection The Darkened Temple was awarded a Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Poetry (2008 University of Nebraska Press). An earlier collection, Begin Here, was awarded a Sarasota Poetry Theatre Press Chapbook Prize.

A graduate of the Creative Writing Program at New York University and a recipient of awards from the New York Times, New York University, Prairie Schooner, Hedgebrook, and Dorland Mountain Arts Colony, L’Esperance lives in Los Angeles.

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Diane Lockward

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Diane Lockward is the author of three poetry books, most recently Temptation by Water. Her previous books are What Feeds Us, which received the 2006 Quentin R. Howard Poetry Prize, and Eve’s Red Dress. She is also the author of two chapbooks, Against Perfection and Greatest Hits: 1997-2010. A craft book, The Crafty Poet: A Portable Workshop, is forthcoming (Wind Publications, 2013).

Her work has also been featured on Poetry Daily, Verse Daily, and The Writer’s Almanac. She is the recipient of a Poetry Fellowship from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and the first place winner of the 2012 Naugatuck River Review’s poetry contest.

Click the photo to read poetry by Diane Lockward.
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Christine Shan Shan Hou & Audra Wolowiec

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Christine Shan Shan Hou is a poet, critic, and artist living in Brooklyn, New York. Publications include Accumulations (Publication Studio, 2010) and Concrete Sound (2011), a collaborative artists’ book with Audra Wolowiec. Her awards include The Flow Chart Foundation/The Academy for American Poets and the Zora Neale Hurston Scholarship.

Audra Wolowiec is an interdisciplinary artist based in Brooklyn, New York, whose work oscillates between sculpture, sound, text and performance. Her work has been featured in The Brooklyn Rail, textsound, and Thresholds (MIT Dept of Architecture). She currently teaches at Parsons in the Art, Media and Technology Department.

Click the photo to read excerpts from Concrete Sound.
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Kate Kingston

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Kate Kingston’s most recent book of poems, Shaking the Kaleidoscope , published by Lost Horse Press, 2012, was a finalist in the 2011 Idaho Prize for Poetry. Previous collections of her poetry include In My Dreams Neruda, El Río de las Animas Perdidas en Purgatorio, and Unwritten Letters. Her poems can be found in the Atlanta Review, Ellipsis, Great River Review, Hawai’i Review, Hunger Mountain, Margie, Nimrod, the Pinch, Rattle, Runes, and Sugar House Review. Kingston received her MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Norwich University.

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James Crews

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James Crews was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri. He has an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is at work on a PhD at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He is the author of three chapbooks, What Has Not Yet Left (Copperdome Prize) Bending the Knot (Gertrude Press Chapbook Prize) and One Hundred Small Yellow Envelopes: A Poem After the Life and Work of Felix Gonzalez-Torres (Parallel Press). He lives in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Gregory Orr

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Gregory Orr is the author of twelve collections of poetry, including the most recent, River Inside the River: Poems (Norton, 2013). He is also the author of a memoir, The Blessing, which was chosen by Publisher’s Weekly as one of the fifty best non-fiction books of 2002.

He is a Professor of English at the University of Virginia, where he has taught since 1975 and was the founder and first director of its MFA Program in Writing. He lives with his wife, the painter Trisha Orr in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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Nancy Simpson

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Nancy Simpson is the author of three poetry collections: Across Water, Night Student, (both published by State Street Press) and most recently Living Above the Frost Line: New and Selected Poems, the first in the new Laureate Series, published (2010) at Carolina Wren Press. In the same year, Simpson edited Echoes Across the Blue Ridge an anthology of stories, essays and poems by southern Appalachian writers with an introduction by Robert Morgan.

Nancy Simpson continues to write and publish, continues to advise and consult with poets and writers, while maintaining her full sun perennial garden in the middle of a deciduous forest on the north side of Cherry Mountain in Hayesville, North Carolina.

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Patricia Smith

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Patricia Smith is the author of six books of poetry, including Blood Dazzler, a finalist for the National Book Award, and her latest, Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah, a finalist for the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America and the Balcones Prize. Her work has appeared in Poetry, The Paris Review, TriQuarterly, Tin House and in both Best American Poetry and Best American Essays.

Patricia is a professor at the College of Staten Island and an instructor in the MFA program at Sierra Nevada College.

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Geoffrey Nutter

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Originally from California, Geoffrey Nutter has lived in New York City for many years. He is the author of four collections of poetry, including A Summer Evening (winner of the 2001 Colorado Prize), Water’s Leaves and Other Poems (winner of the 2004 Verse Press Prize), Christopher Sunset (Wave Books, April 2010), and most recently, The Rose of January (Wave Books, June 2013).

Nutter has taught at The New School, Columbia University, New York University, and the University of Iowa.

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Diane Gilliam

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Diane Gilliam lives in Akron, Ohio, where she works as a poet and quilter. Her first book, One of Everything tells the stories of four generations of women in her family, beginning on Stepp Mountain in eastern Kentucky and ending in a shopping mall in Akron. Her second book, Kettle Bottom, is written in the voices of people living in the coal camps at the time of the 1920-21 West Virginia Mine Wars. Diane Gilliam is the winner of the 2013 $50,000 Gift of Freedom from the A Room of Her Own Foundation.

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Hyesim, Ian Haight, & T'ae-yong Ho

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Chin’gak Kuksa Hyesim was the first Zen Master dedicated to poetry in Korea. Magnolia and Lotus is drawn from the only known book of Hyseim’s poetry, Poems by Muuija, a transcript kept in the archives of the University of Kumasawa in Japan. The book is an important text in Korean letters. It is only the second collection of poetry by a Buddhist Master in Korea, and the poems, though often about Buddhism, are not only about this theme.

Translators Ian Haight and T’ae-Yong Ho worked from an original Chinese manuscript, also using Korean language scholarship and translations for reference and context.

Click on the photo to read excerpts from the collection.
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Michel Butor & Jeffrey Gross

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Michel-Marie-François Butor was born in 1926 in Mons-en-Baroeul, France. A novelist, poet, and essayist, he is one of the leading exponents of the nouveau roman (“new novel”), the avant-garde French novel that emerged in the 1950s. Butor studied philosophy at the Sorbonne and from 1951 to 1953 was a lecturer at the University of Manchester. He was subsequently a teacher in Thessaloníki, Greece, Geneva, Switz, and numerous other cities in the United States and France.

This translation and introduction by Jeffrey Gross is a Gwarlingo exclusive. To the best of Gross’s knowledge, La Banlieue de l’Aube à l’Aurore (The Suburbs from Dawn to Daybreak) has never been translated into English.

Click the photo to read poetry by Michel Butor.




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